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Monthly Archives: August 2015

 

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ISRAEL WILL NEVER BE A SECOND CZECHOSLOVAKIA

By Shoula Romano Horing

AMERICAN THINKER

August 29, 2015

Israel is not like the Czechoslovakia of 1938 and never will be.

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 Israel is an independent military and nuclear power that intends to use its right of self-defense against Iran and its terrorist proxies whether “Emperor” Obama  likes it or not, or tries to stop it.

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Obama and his army of Democratic followers in the Congress, progressive groups, and the media repeatedly state their main argument in favor of the agreement, which is that Israel is the only country in the world opposing the Iran nuclear deal. First,  It seems that President  Obama  and his supporters have not paid attention to a recent CNN poll taken on  August 20  that  found that 60 percent of Americans  disapprove of how Obama is handling the Iran deal, and  56 percent  believe that Congress should reject it.

Secondly, like any other self-respecting sovereign country, Israel is against any deal that threatens her own survival by an evil Jihadist Islamic state clearly intent on its annihilation, which is being imposed on her by world powers as a fait accompli.

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It seems that Obama and his supporters are delusional, expecting that Israel will allow itself to become a second Czechoslovakia. They are outraged and shocked that Israel has not only refused to quietly accept this very bad deal but dares to fight the deal publicly, loudly, and proudly.

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Like Czechoslovakia in 1938, Israel is a small democracy surrounded by hostile nations, and like Czechoslovakia, it was excluded from negotiations that led to a diplomatic deal that shapes its fate and threatens its survival. In 1938, the enlightened democracies in Europe decided to sacrifice Czechoslovakia for a comfortable, temporary solution. The Munich agreement was signed, when Britain and France believed that handing Czechoslovakia to Hitler was the only way to save the world from another war. It is regarded as the shameful culmination of the Allies refusal to confront Nazi aggression and gave Hitler what he wanted in exchange for his verbal promise of “peace in our time” as Neville Chamberlain called it.

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In his biography of Franklin Delano Roosevelt, Champion of Freedom, Conrad Black recalls the scene when the poor Czechoslovakian delegates were brought into the room to be informed of their nation’s fate as set out in the Munich Agreement. “No Czech answer was requested. They were handed a fait accompli. The Czechs wept, and Hubert Masarik (Czech diplomat attending the Munich conference) said, prophetically and justly: ‘They don’t know what they are doing to us or to themselves.… These poor, good men were the final players in a macabre and shameful Gothic tragedy.”

 

The Jewish state has for 67 years been mourning its beloved soldiers who have courageously died defending it from the evil regimes that surround her. However, it will never weep over a deal imposed on it by a morally bankrupt world. Those days of passivity were over when the enormity of the Holocaust was revealed. The Jewish state has been fighting for itself on its own since its independence.

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Obama’s threats of a military attack on Iran when violations of the deal occur are not taken seriously by anyone and are a source of laughter for the Iranian regime. Israel does not need  the U.S. or any another party to save her but it does need for Obama and the world powers to move away from Israel’s path and let it do everything in its means to minimize the nuclear threat, and the more menacing conventional  threat resulting from the hundreds of  billions of dollars Iran and its terrorist proxies will get  from the deal.

For the last two years, Obama has been trying to tie Israeli hands and prevent it from practicing its right to self-defense against Iran. Dan Raviv from CBS News reported in March 2014, that the Obama’s administration has asked Israel to stop killing key scientists in the Iranian nuclear program while Obama has been negotiating. In an August interview with the German magazine Der Spiegel, Israeli Defense Minister Moshe Yaalon implicitly warned that the assassinations could be renewed by saying;” I am not responsible for the lives of Iranian scientists.’

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But much worse, in Article 10 of the deal, Obama and world powers have agreed that they will assist Iran in thwarting attempts to undermine its nuclear program. The agreement stipulates that they, with the Iranians, will foster “cooperation through training  and workshops to strengthen Iran’s ability to protect against and respond to, nuclear security threats, including sabotage, as well as to enable effective  and sustainable nuclear security  and physical protection systems.”

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Recent years have seen various mishaps befall the Iranian nuclear program, from powerful computer viruses to the death of the nuclear scientists, which world media outlets have often attributed to the Israeli intelligence agency, Mossad. According to an audio recording with former Defense Minister Ehud Barak leaked to an Israeli television channel on August 22, Israeli leaders planned to attack military targets in Iran in 2010, 2011, and 2012 but were held back due to the opinions of other government and military leaders.

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It is quite disturbing that the U.S. as well as the U.K., Russia, China, France, and Germany will actively try to prevent covert actions against the Iranian nuclear program, as well as any potential military operation against Iran, making such options far more complicated and dangerous for a country like Israel. Congress should ask Obama whether he will order U.S. jets to shoot down Israeli jets intent on destroying an Iranian nuclear weapon facility.

The Congressional Democrats must not repeat the mistakes of the past and sacrifice the future for the present; The Democrats must not ignore Iranian aggression in the hopes of gaining an illusory peace. A vote for the deal is a vote for the beginning of the next war between Israel and Iran and its proxies. The Jewish people can never again remain passive in the face of genocidal enemies. 

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Shoula Romano Horing is an Israeli born and raised.

Why university shouldn’t be a free ride for your kids, even if it could be

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All in costs for post-secondary education in Canada can now easily top $20,000 a year.

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As a parent or grandparent, you may have saved and put yourself in a position to cover all of these expenses. If you are in that position, you have a decision to make: Should your offspring head off to the ivory towers with all of their expenses covered — allowing them to focus solely on getting good grades (and having some fun)?

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As a financial planner, I find the answer to this question tells me a lot about a client.

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There is no wrong answer, but I certainly have a point of view. My wife and I share the view (to my children’s chagrin) that our kids should pay for some of their post-secondary education. Our feeling is that university or college is a time to learn more about the world, and also to add another level of personal maturity and responsibility. Financial management and budgeting are an important part of that education.

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Quite a number of my clients who have ‘bombed out’ of university, almost always, those are kids whose parents are affluent.

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As it turns out, having the student take some financial responsibility brings with it a number of positive benefits, not the least of which is improved marks. A U.S. study from 2013 found that the more money parents paid for their childrens’ college educations, the worse their kids tended to perform, at least when it came to grades. The study, by Laura Hamilton, a sociology professor at University of California, Merced, found that larger contributions from parents were linked to lower grades among students at a variety of four-year colleges.

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If you think about it, this shouldn’t be surprising. If, as a student, you put your own money on the line, you will tend to take your education more seriously. You will be less likely to skip classes when you realize how much each class is actually costing you.

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One person who sees the implication of this first hand is Sabrina McTaggart, an Ottawa-based Career Coach for young adults. Her clients mostly fall into the 15 to 25 age group.

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“Quite a number of my clients who have ‘bombed out’ of university, almost always, those are kids whose parents are affluent and have had their entire education paid,” McTaggart said, adding, “I have never seen a student who has had to pay most or all of their own way, who has dropped out in the same way.”

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When directly asked whether parents should pay for everything, McTaggart says “no.”

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“I think you are doing your young adult a disservice,” she adds. “They should have some skin in the game.”

 

Ted Rechtshaffen

NATIONAL POST

August 21, 2015

 

STEPHEN HARPER

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EVERYTHING YOU WANTED TO KNOW AND WERE AFRAID TO ASK ABOUT CANADA’S AUTHENTIC 22nd PRIME MINISTER

Just before Christmas 2013, a motorcade of three black cars stopped in front of a nondescript ranch house in the Varsity Village neighbourhood of Calgary. Plain-clothes RCMP stood guard as a figure emerged from one of the vehicles and knocked on the front door.

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“There was enough warning to get coffee ready,” says Jim Hawkes.

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Nobody would have faulted him for hating the tall, blue-eyed man standing on his front step.

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He’d ditch all the public obligations that come with the job

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As a Progressive Conservative MP for Calgary West, Hawkes had given him his first political job as a chief aide in Ottawa. But the young man soon defected to the upstart Reform Party and mounted a challenge to his old boss’s seat. On election day in 1993, a 34-year-old “Steve” sent his mentor to a humiliating third place.

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That man, of course, was Stephen Harper. And those around Hawkes — including Harper’s then-girlfriend — balked at the apparent betrayal. But 22 years later, there’s not a hint of bitterness in the older politician’s voice.

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Mark Kennedy/Postmedia NewsJim Hawkes, the former Progressive Conservative MP who Harper worked for as a legislative aide in 1985-86. He was defeated in the 1993 election when Harper ran against him in Calgary West as a Reform candidate.

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“He was better than anybody I’ve ever employed,” says Hawkes in a phone interview from the retirement home in Calgary where he now lives. “I’m proud of him.”

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Hawkes’s wife Joanne had died only a few months before that visit. Harper came in, handed his former mentor a copy of his new book, A Great Game, and for an hour they chatted, one on one.

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“A good part of it was talking about life,” says Hawkes, “not political things – family things.”

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This image — the prime minister relaxing with a cup of coffee and talking marriage and parenting with an old man — would be hard for most Canadians to picture. Rarely has a figure as guarded as Stephen Harper ascended to the highest political office of a Group of Seven nation.

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Behind closed doors, Canada’s 22nd prime minister can swear like a “longshoreman,” is known to greet unwelcome news with “volcanic” outbursts of fury and has an uncanny talent for pitch-perfect impersonations. But to most Canadians he is a poker-faced cipher: never angry, rarely laughing, awkward in social settings and most comfortable when talking fiscal policy.

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Paul Chiasson/ The Canadian PressLaureen Harper, left, applauds her husband, Conservative Leader Stephen Harper along with their children Rachel and Ben during a campaign rally in Ajax, Ont., on Monday — this is the most we’ve seen Harper’s kids on the campaign trail in his years as party leader.

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Stephen Harper is a nerd who came from nowhere, corralled an estranged coalition of Canadian conservatives and smashed his way into nearly a decade of power. And he did it without being cuddly, charismatic or particularly quotable.

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Nine years in, that’s probably just the way he wants it.

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“He’d ditch all the public obligations that come with the job tomorrow, if he could,” says Jim Armour, a former director of communications for the Conservative leader.

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Other prime ministers have thrived on galas and state dinners. But aside from the occasional chance to meet hockey greats, Harper would pass up ribbon-cuttings for strategy sessions.

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He lives in a hard-drinking town, but never imbibes outside the occasional photo op. After the Parliament shootings last October, as shocked colleagues thirsted for a stiff drink, Harper called for a tall glass of Diet Coke.

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Gavin Young/Calgary HeraldStephen Harper shakes hands as he leaves the Conservative Party campaign headquarters at the Telus Convention Centre in Calgary following his election win late Monday evening May 2, 2011.

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He’s ruthless at destroying opponents, but — strangely for a career politician — takes no joy in it.

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In 2011, as Conservatives across Canada bubbled with schadenfreude at witnessing the political ruin of the Liberals’ Michael Ignatieff, it is unlikely their leader felt even a twang of guilty pleasure.

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“He’s like a predator; there’s no emotion to it,”

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 says Gerry Nicholls, who worked with Harper at the National Citizens’ Coalition, a conservative think tank. “When a wolf goes after a rabbit, it’s not because it hates rabbits.”

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He “reads everything,” becoming the bane of a privy council that had grown accustomed to prime ministers skimming their reports. He is known to catch the tiniest of spelling errors — and respond with swift reprimands scribbled in the margins. Friends call this “meticulous,” enemies call it “micromanaging.”

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He’s like a predator; there’s no emotion to it.

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He gets angry. But it’s not the out-of-control BlackBerry-throwing tantrum so common to Ottawa, it’s a measured expulsion of rage designed chillingly to drive a point home. One staffer has described it as a “spectacular thing.”

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He comes from a Presbyterian background and has occasionally been spotted at an Ottawa evangelical church, but staffers haven’t heard him say a single religious thing— nor have they found him unwilling to work on a Sunday. Indeed, Harper chose to announce the current election on the Sabbath.

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Perhaps most surprisingly, Canada’s socks-with-sandals prime minister harbours an uncanny talent for comic delivery.

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Stuart Gradon/Calgary HeraldCynthia Williams, Prime Minister Stephen Harper’s former girlfriend in Calgary, June 20, 2013.

 

Cynthia Williams, who dated Harper in university, says in private situations he has a dry wit akin to the TV character, Frasier Crane. “He was always making me laugh,” she says.

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In policy meetings and hotel rooms, Conservative staffers have got used to his penchant for launching into impromptu impressions.

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“I used to prep him for question period, and he would answer as Jean Chrétien or Brian Mulroney or John Diefenbaker,” says Keith Beardsley, a former senior adviser to Harper.

 

In speeches, he’s been known to mix partisan jabs with self-deprecating riffs.

 

“(My father) is an accountant, as are both my brothers. I decided to become an economist because I didn’t have the personality to be an accountant,” Harper told the 2002 Ottawa Press gallery dinner when he was opposition leader.

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It’s a public side to Harper that has dissolved almost completely since he became prime minister. Since then he has stopped showing up at press gallery dinners and dispensed with anything in question period that wasn’t a staid statement of facts.

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It was at the funeral last year of former finance minister Jim Flaherty — who had fallen out with the prime minister before his sudden death — that attendees saw a brief glimpse of the old Harper.

“Jim, as fiercely partisan as he was, was also genuinely liked and respected by his opponents, liked by his enemies,” said Harper in his remarks, which carried a tinge of remorse.

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“That … something I envy; I can’t even get my friends to like me.”

 

CP PHOTO/Chuck StoodyFrom a young age, Stephen Harper was a walking strategy computer – but he recoiled at the glad-handing and baby-kissing required of a politician.

 

It was only 13 years ago Harper arose out of relative obscurity to head the Canadian Alliance and begin wielding his near-mystical powers to unite the “warring tribes” of Canadian conservatism.

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He was a high school valedictorian who had sailed through university with honours, an obsessive strategist whose only hobby was politics. The only problem was, he didn’t have a hint of personal charisma or warmth.

 

David Lazarowych / Calgary HeraldStephen Harper on Oct. 11, 1988.

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A “behind the scenes” guy Preston Manning had snapped out of graduate school to form the brain of his fledgling Reform Party, the young economist was a walking strategy computer – but he recoiled at the glad-handing and baby-kissing required of a politician.

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He detested small talk. He thrived in political debates at university, but vanished when his opponents tried to take him for beer afterward. Williams was the one “dragging” him to social functions.

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Later, it would be Laureen Teskey doing the dragging, with Harper riding on the back of her motorcycle.

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“He’s not really comfortable in big crowds, never has been, probably never will be,” says Robert Mansell, the University of Calgary professor who first connected Harper with the fledgling Reform Party.

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With Reform drafting its staffers as candidates, Harper had, in fact, chosen the one riding he figured he was guaranteed to lose: Calgary West, where his former boss held more than 70 per cent of the votes.

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“He phoned me up to ask if it would be OK because he didn’t want to interfere with our relationship,” says Hawkes.

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BY Tristin Hopper

Tristin Hopper is an award-winning reporter

working for the National desk of the National Post

08 15 2015

 

HILLARY CLINTON

Candidate for the Democratic Party nomination for U.S. President

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Hillary Diane Rodham Clinton (born October 26, 1947) is a candidate for the Democratic Party nomination for U.S. President, a former first lady, former United States Secretary of State in the administration of President Barack Obama from 2009 to 2013, and former United States Senator representing New York from 2001 to 2009. As the wife of President Bill Clinton, she was First Lady of the United States from 1993 to 2001.

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A native of Illinois, Hillary Rodham was the first student commencement speaker at Wellesley College in 1969 and earned a J.D. from Yale Law School in 1973. After a stint as a Congressional legal counsel, she moved to Arkansas and married Bill Clinton in 1975. She co-founded Arkansas Advocates for Children and Families in 1977, became the first female chair of the Legal Services Corporation in 1978, and was named the first female partner at Rose Law Firm in 1979. The National Law Journal twice listed her as one of the hundred most influential lawyers in America. During her tenure as First Lady of Arkansas from 1979 to 1981 and 1983 to 1992, she led a task force that reformed Arkansas’s education system and sat on the board of directors of Wal-Mart and several other corporations.

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As First Lady of the United States, her major initiative, the Clinton health care plan of 1993, failed to gain approval from the U.S. Congress. In 1997 and 1999, she played a leading role in advocating the creation of the State Children’s Health Insurance Program, the Adoption and Safe Families Act and the Foster Care Independence Act. Her years as First Lady drew a polarized response from the American public. The only First Lady to have been subpoenaed, she testified before a federal grand jury in 1996 regarding the Whitewater controversy, but was never charged with wrongdoing in this or several other investigations during her husband’s presidency. Her marriage to the president was subjected to considerable public discussion following the Lewinsky scandal of 1998.

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After moving to New York, Clinton was elected in 2000 as the first female senator from the state; she is the only First Lady ever to have run for public office. Following the September 11 attacks, she supported military action in Afghanistan and the Iraq Resolution, but subsequently objected to the George W. Bush administration’s conduct of the Iraq War. She opposed most of Bush’s domestic policies. Clinton was re-elected to the Senate in 2006. Running in the Democratic primaries in the 2008 presidential election, Clinton’s campaign won far more primaries and delegates than any other female candidate in American history, but narrowly lost the nomination to Obama.

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As Secretary of State in the Obama administration from January 2009 to February 2013, Clinton was at the forefront of the U.S. response to the Arab Spring and advocated the U.S. military intervention in Libya. She took responsibility for security lapses related to the 2012 Benghazi attack, which resulted in the deaths of American consulate personnel, but defended her personal actions in regard to the matter. Clinton visited more countries than any other Secretary of State. She viewed “smart power” as the strategy for asserting U.S. leadership and values, by combining military power with diplomacy and American capabilities in economics, technology, and other areas. She encouraged empowerment of women everywhere and used social media to communicate the U.S. message abroad. Leaving office at the end of Obama’s first term, she authored her fifth book and undertook speaking engagements before announcing her second run for the Democratic nomination in the 2016 presidential election.

 

CARLY FIORINA

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Cara Carleton “Carly” Fiorina (née Sneed; September 6, 1954) is a former business executive and current Chair of the non-profit philanthropic organization Good360. Starting in 1980, Fiorina rose through the ranks to become an executive at AT&T and its equipment and technology spinoff, Lucent. As chief executive officer of Hewlett-Packard (HP) from 1999 to 2005, she was the first woman to lead a company in the top 20 as ranked by Fortune magazine.

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In 2002, Fiorina undertook the biggest high-tech merger in history at the time with rival computer company Compaq, which made HP the world’s largest personal computer manufacturer. Following HP’s gain in market share as a result of the 2002 merger, Fiorina laid off thousands of U.S. employees, but by 2004 the number of employees was about the same as the pre-merger total. On February 9, 2005 the HP board of directors forced Fiorina to resign as chief executive officer and chairman, over disagreements about the company’s performance, disappointing earning reports, and her resistance to transferring authority to division heads. At that time, HP’s stock price had fallen by approximately half its value compared to when Fiorina had started, while the overall NASDAQ index had decreased by about a quarter owing to turbulence in the tech sector.

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After leaving HP, Fiorina served on the boards of several organizations and as an adviser to Republican John McCain‘s 2008 presidential campaign. She won a three-person race for the Republican nomination for the United States Senate from California in 2010, but lost the general election to incumbent Democratic Senator Barbara Boxer by 10 points.

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On May 4, 2015 Fiorina announced her candidacy for the Republican nomination in the 2016 presidential election.

 

BERNIE SANDERS

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The junior United States Senator from Vermont

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A candidate for the Democratic Party‘s nomination for President in the 2016 U.S. presidential election

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Sanders is the longest-serving independent in U.S. congressional history. A self-described democratic socialist, he favors policies similar to those of social democratic parties in Europe, particularly those of Scandinavia. He caucuses with the Democratic Party and has been the ranking minority member on the Senate Budget Committee since January 2015.

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Born in Brooklyn, New York, Sanders attended Brooklyn College before transferring to and graduating from the University of Chicago, where he was a member of the Young People’s Socialist League, and active in the Civil Rights Movement as a student protest organizer for the Congress of Racial Equality and the Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee] In 1963, he participated in the March on Washington for Jobs and Freedom.

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Sanders settled in Vermont in 1968, and ran unsuccessfully for Governor and U.S. Senator in the early to mid-1970s as a member of the Liberty Union Party. As an independent supported by the Vermont Progressive Party, Sanders was elected mayor of Burlington, Vermont’s most populous city, in 1981. He was reelected to three more two-year mayoral terms before being elected to represent Vermont’s at-large congressional district in the United States House of Representatives in 1990. He served as a congressman for 16 years before being elected to succeed the retiring Republican-turned-independent Jim Jeffords in the U.S. Senate in 2006. In 2012, he was reelected by a large margin, capturing almost 71% of the popular vote.

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Since his election to the Senate, Sanders has emerged as a leading progressive voice on issues like income inequality, universal healthcare, climate change, LGBT rights, and campaign finance reform. He rose to national prominence on the heels of his 2010 filibuster of the proposed extension of the Bush-era tax rates for the wealthy. Sanders is also outspoken on civil liberties, and has been particularly critical of mass surveillance policies such as the Patriot Act along with racial discrimination in the criminal justice system.

Your time is limited…

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 Steve Jobs

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Your time is limited, so don’t waste it living someone else’s life. Don’t be trapped by dogma – which is living with the results of other people’s thinking.

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Don’t let the noise of others’ opinions drown out your own inner voice.

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And most important, have the courage to follow your heart and intuition.

How Much Forgetfulness is Normal?

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If your memory problems include forgetting people’s names and where you put the keys, you may be able to rest easy.

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By Andrea Atkins

 

Do you forget where you put your keys? Are you confounded when you see your neighbor’s youngest son and can’t remember his name? And where are your reading glasses? How much forgetfulness is normal—and when should you be concerned?

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Becoming more forgetful is a natural part of aging, experts agree.

“Our brains age just like the rest of our bodies,” says Gary Small, M.D., director of the UCLA Longevity Center and co-author with Gigi Vorgan of Two Weeks to A Younger Brain. “One of the manifestations of brain age is forgetfulness. It’s a common experience. We joke about it all the time. The concern behind all the humor is that these changes may be the first sign of something more serious. How do you differentiate the normal from dementia?” 

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Unfortunately, there’s no easy answer to that question, says Richard C. Senelick, M.D., a neurologist and medical director of Health South in San Antonio, Texas. Unlike various types of cancer for which there are screening tests and then courses of treatment, dementia and Alzheimer’s Disease cannot be screened, and even if they are discovered, there is no treatment that can reverse their course.

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Senelick says most of us will experience memory loss as a natural course of getting older. “One of the first things to go is the speed of information processing. Your ability to quickly read, understand, and process information slows, as does your ability to handle more than one task at a time. And of course, you will find yourself grasping for words every now and then. But more worrisome is a major change in your ability to function in the world.”

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Small agrees. “If you forget where you placed your keys, that’s normal,” he says. “If you forget how to use your keys, that’s a problem. You may once in a while forget where you parked your car, but if that happens to you once a week, that’s more like dementia.” 

Normal Forgetting Is a Function of Distraction

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“One reason we forget is that we haven’t given the information meaning. If something’s meaningful, it’s memorable,” Small says. “Pay attention to what you are doing.”

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In addition to age-related brain changes, graying Americans are often full of information that distracts them from what they wish to remember. “We focus on what’s important for our goal and we leave all the other stuff aside,” Small says. You may remember that the meal you had was great, even if you can’t remember the name of the restaurant. “As our businesses grow or our lives become more complex, we don’t pay attention because some information is not necessary to accomplish our goals.”

But if you are truly worried about how serious your forgetfulness is, Senelick says a test developed by researchers at Washington University in St. Louis to differentiate between normal aging and cognitive decline is a helpful tool. It consists of eight yes-or-no questions that assess whether there has been a marked change over time in the person’s behavior as seen through a series of scenarios. If you answer yes to two of them, then it may be the first signs of dementia or Alzheimer’s. Called the AD8 Interview, the test can be given to you, your spouse, or your children to assess your cognitive status.

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Most Common Memory Complaints

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Even if memory problems are a common sign of aging, forgetting important things can be annoying and embarrassing. With Dr. Small’s help, we’ve summed up the four most common memory complaints, and some tips for dealing with them: 

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Remembering names and faces:

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You recognize the face but can’t recall the name. “Our memories live in neighborhoods, “ Small explains, “and when we try to remember something, it helps if we can associate it with something that will get us into the right neighborhood.”

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Tip:

As soon as you meet someone, try to associate his or her name with something familiar. If, for example, you’re introduced to Mr. White and he has grey hair, you can think, “White has white hair.”

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Tip-of-the-tongue problems:

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You can’t think of the name of the movie you saw last night—until you’re driving home from the dinner party where you made a fool of yourself groping for it. It’s again about making an association for yourself that allows you to pull it out of the right file in which you’ve stored it in your brain.

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  Tip: 

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Small recommends writing down (on paper or on your Smart phone) the name of the movie and as many words as you can associate with it. That simple exercise will allow you to access those words the next time and make it easier to remember the movie title (or book name or painting or whatever it is that’s on the “tip of your tongue.”)

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Memory places:

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Forgetting where you put things can be solved simply by always putting them in the same place every time you put them down.

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  Tip: 

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If you can’t put your keys or your wallet down in its usual home, then say to yourself as you’re putting it down, “I am putting my keys on the nightstand.” And, says Small, if you can’t do either of those things at the moment you’re about to put them down, then don’t put them down!

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Prospective memory:

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If you forget to bring things to appointments, or walk out of the house without what you need for an important meeting, then the fix is to slow down. 

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Tip: 

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“It’s about creating memory habits,” Small says. “What I recommend is to check your calendar at the same time and in the same place each day. Before you leave your house, think through what’s involved in what you are going to do. Do you have your insurance card? Do you have the folder you need to prepare your taxes? Do you need to bring anything else with you?” 

 

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Some Other Tricks for Keeping Your Memory Sharp

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If you want to have a strong brain as you age, take care of your heart. Put another way: The same things that ensure heart health ensure brain health, Small says. To keep your brain flexible and young, try to do the following: 

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Exercise:

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Exercise gets your heart pumping which means more oxygen reaches your brain, which means that your brain gets healthier. Exercise also releases hormones that create a hospitable environment for the growth of brain cells.

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Reduce stress:

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Stress also releases hormones like cortisol, which can inhibit brain cells. If you are stressed, you may also be taxing your memory because you are focusing on those things that worry you instead of the things that you need to do.

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Eat well:

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Filling your body with lots of sugar and empty carbohydrates could leave you with a serious case of brain fog because you’re not fueling your brain’s needs. Add Omega fatty acids (like those that come from fish and olive oil) and you’ll be giving it the building blocks it needs to create new cells. Meat (especially liver), seafood, eggs, milk and cheese are foods rich in Vitamin B-12 can help the brain by encouraging methylation, a process that brains need to be healthy, and which, in some studies, is shown to be lacking in people with Alzheimer’s Disease.

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new study from Rush University Medical Center 

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and published in the journal Alzheimer’s & Dementia, says that older adults who rigorously follow a specific diet showed appeared to be 7.5 years younger cognitively than those who did not. The study followed 960 adults who had no dementia and who were average age of 81 at the start of the study. Participants ate the Mediterranean Diet and the DASH diet, which have both been shown to improve cardiovascular health. It includes eating three servings a day of whole grains, green leafy vegetables, and one other vegetable each day, along with a glass of wine. Snacks include nuts, beans, and berries, and poultry and fish at least twice a week. Key to success on this diet is to limit unhealthy foods, especially butter and sweets as well as whole-fat cheese, fried or fast food.

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Check your medications:

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Pain medications, tranquilizers like Xanax, and blood pressure medicines can all affect how your brain works, Senelick says. If you’ve been on a medication and are feeling confused or like your memory is not working, check the Internet to see if memory loss might be a side effect, and then ask your doctor to prescribe something else. “For most of medicines, you have another choice,” Senelick says.

Pierre Trudeau

Prime Minister (1919–2000)

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Pierre Trudeau was the 15th prime minister of Canada, famous for his youthful energy, his stance against a separate Quebec and suppressing violent revolt.

 

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Quotes

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“The state has no business in the bedrooms of the nation.”

—Pierre Trudeau

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Synopsis

 

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Born in Montreal on October 18, 1919, Pierre Trudeau was the 15th prime minister of Canada for nearly 16 years. His charismatic personality matched the revolutionary ideas of the 1960s. In additional to several advances he made for the Liberal Party, he gained a reputation for dating high-profile women. His 1982 partition of the Canadian constitution greatly advanced Canadians’ civil rights.

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Biography

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Pierre Trudeau was born on October 18, 1919, and raised in the wealthy Montreal suburb of Outremont. His mother, Grace Elliott, was of both French and Scottish descent, so Trudeau and his two siblings grew up speaking both French and English. His family was quite wealthy by the time he was a teenager, as his father, a businessman and lawyer, had sold his gas station business to Imperial Oil some years prior. After graduating from the elite Jesuit preparatory school Collège Jean-de-Brébeuf, Trudeau went on to receive a law degree from the University of Montreal. Shortly after graduating, he landed a position as a desk officer for the Privy Council. From 1951 to 1961, he practiced law, specializing in labor and civil liberty cases, issues he would later bring into focus for all of Canada.

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In 1961, he joined the staff of the University of Montreal as a professor of constitutional law. Four years later, Liberal Party leaders were searching for potential candidates. Trudeau and two of his colleagues were invited to run for party seats. All three men won in the election that year; Trudeau became Minister of Justice. His flamboyant and charismatic personality meshed well with the changing attitudes and opinions of the late 1960s. Within a year, he had reformed the divorce laws and liberalized the laws on abortion and homosexuality.

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When Canada’s then prime minister, Lester Pearson, retired in 1967, Trudeau campaigned for leadership of the Liberal Party. His ideas were popular, and on April 6, 1968, he won the post. His election as prime minister benefited from an unprecedented wave of youth involvement. “Trudeaumania,” as it was called, was the nickname given to the excitement brought on by throngs of teenagers who supported Trudeau. Within 20 days of winning leadership of his party, Trudeau was sworn in as Canada’s 15th prime minister.

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His time in office started off with a bang. As soon as he was elected, he began fighting for universal health care. He also worked to reform governmental caucus meetings to make them more efficient. The 1970 “October Crisis” tested his stance against terrorists; he invoked the War Measures Act, giving the government overarching power to arrest without trial. On domestic matters, he championed the official implementation of bilingualism. Perhaps the two most significant events that occurred during Trudeau’s governance were the referendum on Quebec’s sovereignty, for which Trudeau fought and won to keep Quebec part of Canada, and Canada’s patriation from Great Britain. In 1981, the Canadian House of Commons approved Trudeau’s reform to officially and completely separate Canada from Queen Elizabeth II’s Britain. This monumental act brought about new and widespread civil rights for all Canadians.

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After 16 years as prime minister, Trudeau resigned from politics in 1984. On September 28, 2000, Trudeau passed away, just short of his 81st birthday. He had suffered from Parkinson’s disease, but the official cause of death was prostate cancer. His passing prompted tears and tributes across all of Canada.